Origami Pomanders

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origami pomander diy

Styrofoam balls for craft projects gives me sticker shock.  I wanted some smaller pomanders to go with my large origami topiaries I made earlier (posted here).  They will be hanging about the ceremony space and on the ends of the pews.  The best thing about this project is no styrofoam balls needed (yay!).  So the cost is the cost of paper and some ribbon.

Supplies:

Paper cut into squares (recommend 4″ or 5″ squares or the pomander will be too tiny).

Ribbon (about 2′ per pomander)

Glue gun, scissors

Maybe a stick/skewer to help thread the ribbon.

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Cost & Time:

The cost is paper.  A 12″ x 12″ sheet of scrapbook paper makes almost 2 flowers and is about $.20 each (about 7 sheets of paper per pomander). Glue sticks, the cost of your ribbon (I spent $3 for a spool which was more than enough to do eight pomanders).

Folding the flowers takes about 5 minutes each (x 12 flowers); gluing them together in the pomander takes about 10 minutes.

Steps:

1) Cut your selected paper into perfect squares and make kusudama flowers.  Each pomander requires 12 completed flowers all of the same size.  For instructions on how to make the flower, see this tutorial.

2) Cut your ribbon to length (how far you want it to hang down) –about 2 feet–and fold it in the middle.  Thread it through the center of one of your flowers (this will be your top flower in the pomander).  I had to use a skewer to help thread the ribbon through.  Knot the ribbon close to the ends and pull the loop taut so the knot sits snuggly right at the base of the flower (see the pics below).

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3) Now you will start the first row of 5 flowers.  Take a loose flower and place it snuggly against the ribboned (top) flower so that one of the petals fits between two petals of the top flower.  Make sure the base of the flowers line up with each other.  Glue in place.

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4) For the next flower, you will get a better fit if you match two petals of the loose flower to the two petals of the top (ribbon) flower.  A petal of the previous glued flower (step 3) will sit in-between of the loose flower (picture explains it much better!) —

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Glue three more flowers working around and that completes row 1.  As you go, just make sure the base (pointy end) of the flowers all line up.  At this point you have completed half of the pomander and it will sit flat.

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5) This step is a repeat of step 3 & 4 above.  This is just row two –five more loose flowers glued to the flowers of the first row.  Again, keep the flower base lined up.

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6) You now have one flower left and one hole to fill.  Glue in the last flower.  Look over your pomander and glue up any loose spots.

DONE!

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Add an extra bow around the base of ribbon if you like.  Or some pretty button/crystal centers to the flowers.

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Table Years (paper time pt 2)

Still printing, cutting, embellishing away.  I am so happy to have this little project done.  It has been on my TO DO list for nearly a year.  I knew I wanted our table numbers for assigned guest seating not to be just functional. I wanted them to be a little fun, and represent “us.”

The years of our lives…

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With bonus factoids 🙂

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An easy enough project, inspired by other pictures I’ve seen with actual table numbers to represent the couple’s age at that point (e.g., table 1 – the bride and groom at 1 year old).

But when it takes you 5 decades of living to find your mate, years just seemed a better choice for us. Besides, we selected years that represented milestones in our lives (born, first day of school, graduations, etc.).

The hardest and most time consuming part of this project was selecting just a few photos to represent our life up to the point we met and fell in love (awww).  We spent an evening down memory lane, and made a deal that each would select their own.  

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The HOW TO:

I had purchased Tolsby frames from the classifieds for about $1 each.  These frames are perfect for this project in that they are two sided -so two pictures (one bride, one groom) per frame.

They were grey/silver, but I painted them with texture spray paint (Krylon Stone) and added a little sparkly with some black glitter while the paint was still wet.  To protect the texture and paint, I used a clear high gloss acrylic sealer.

I measured the inside frame size (4″x6″) and created text boxes in Pages (or any word processing program), scanned the photos into my iMac, and typed the text I wanted (see below). I didn’t worry about the photos fitting exactly in the box since they would but cut down to size once printed anyway.  I just made sure the photo was centered and the text wasn’t too near the edge to keep the frame from covering it.

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My groom loves trivia. So including little historical “factoids” was a nod to him.  I am a Denver Bronco/NFL junkie and like movies.  He has hockey in his bones and is a music aficionado. Hence, the factoids chosen. [And yes I made sure to include the years in which our teams won their respective championships–woohoo!]

I printed on ivory medium weight card stock and just cut them out old school with scissors on the lines.  The edges don’t have to be perfect since the frame covers them.

To make the table number “year” readily visible for our guests, I cut card stock the width of the overall frame, hand punched the corners, added the glitter 3D stickers for the year, and cut out notches so it could slide into the top.

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So, we now have table numbers years so our guests will be able to find their seat. I think our family and friends will enjoy our goofy pics too.

I mean, can you get more 1960’s than this?

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That’s me at 2 years old on the right.  Loving my mom’s hair 🙂

And this is the man I am marrying–What a cutie!

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Painted Paper Flowers

Two nieces married, now it’s my turn. I’m getting married!

I’ve been experimenting with paper flowers for a while. I love the stylized look. They don’t wilt, require no water, and can be done way in advance.

To make it just wee bit more messy, and since I love the look, I paint the petals. I’ve made several styles thus far, but the pics below show my favorite.

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Supplies

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*Regular copy paper (or drawing paper)
*Hot glue gun
*Stick
*2 colors (or more) craft acrylic paint (the cheaper the paint the better, I’ve found)
*Water
*Paint brush (for painting and rolling)
*Tape

CuriousPurplePig Rating: 8.5 oinks, could be messier. I do manage to get paint in my hair though.  Very easy. Takes about 30 minutes per flower.

Steps

Each petal is cut from regular 8×11 paper, free form “teardrop” shape. The outside petals take 1/4 of the sheet, the inside ones, 1/6th. I advise at least 5 petals of each size (10 total). I stack the paper and do them all at once. I cut waves into the edges too.

Lightly fold the paper in 4ths for the larger petals:

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And into 6ths for the smaller, inside petals (fold in half, then into thirds):

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Using two colors of watered down craft acrylic paint, I quickly paint each side of the petals. The water helps to blend the colors. Just follow the form of the petal with your strokes. Only use one brush for both colors. Don’t worry too much how it looks. UPDATE: After making about 50 of these flowers, I’ve found that the cheaper the craft acrylic paint the better.  The “good stuff” is too thick and has to be watered down to much.  I don’t want to offend Craft Smart brand, but it works really well for watered down/blended effects like these flowers. I also only spend about 30 seconds on each side of the petal while painting it.  You don’t have to do designer petals because when it is all put together, it will look great despite the quick paint job.

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I used more darker color on the smaller inside petals, and went lighter on the outside. More water mixed in lightens the paint too.

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{{{{{paint drying}}}}}

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Find a center stick. I have a bunch of old dried stems lying around that I use. But a skewer stick will work too (or a stick from your yard–even better). The larger the flower, the larger the diameter the stick.

UPDATE: I switched from using sticks to florist wire stems like these:

I then glue a piece of styrofoam or rolled paper on the end to give it a larger diameter base to glue the petals. With the wire, I can bend and shape the flowers as needed in the centerpiece, much better.18_gauge_green_stem_floral_wires_20pcs

I use a paint brush handle to roll the paper edges.

Low temp glue glue gun, my best friend. Attach the petals by gluing at the base.

If the paper tears a bit, just dab with glue to seal it. Keep working around until you like it.

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I used more glue and then florist tape to secure it more to the stick.

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Done!

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Cat, for scale.

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Some of my other large, and very small, paper flowers…

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Simple Paper Flowers on Branches

I adapted this project from simple paper flowers by Jeffery Rudell.

These flowering branches will eventually form the center of the centerpiece for my niece’s wedding.

Supplies:

Paper in varying shades of your color for the flower. Bits of tissue paper/napkin for the center, branches (I pick mine up from the yard), white glue.

Time Commitment:

About 20 minutes to make the flowers and glue to the branch (bigger branches = more flowers = more time).

Skill:

Do you remember how to make a spit wad?

Purple Pig Rating:

7.5 oinks out of 10.  The flowers are really sweet and very easy.  The cost is nothing (doesn’t everyone have paper, glue, and yard debris?) Making a lot of flowers is a bit tedious, but again very easy.  Gluing to the branch takes some time.  Hot glue is faster, but shows.  Using white glue takes time to let it dry, but is invisible.  Minimal messy factor, in fact it requires cleaning up your yard of branches.

Detailed Step by Step:

1. Trace a round circle onto your paper in the size you want your flower.  I used a 2″ diameter lid.  Cut out your circles.  Fold/layer your paper to make several circles at once.

2. Fold the circle in half, then in half again, then in half again.  You will have a little cone.  Cut a rounded edge to form the petal shape.  Unfold.

3. Cut out two triangular sections from the flower (to make a more open flower, cut out one section, to make a smaller bud, cut out three sections).  Glue the two end sections together by overlapping.

4. To make a flat base (so you can glue it to a branch), I placed a blunt-ended pencil inside the flower and pressed down onto the table.

5. Make “spit wads” out of a contrasting color from bits of napkin or tissue paper.  A dab of glue in the center of flower will hold them. A shiny bead would look pretty too. Shape the petals by pinching each rounded end between your fingers.

6. Glue to your branch.  Repeat.

6a. (Optional Step): Making smaller buds from your left over cut out bits.

6b. (Optional Step): Use tissue paper (or napkins) and make even smaller circles/flowers for a completely different look.  The small blue flowers are made from 1″ napkin circles, cut “pointy” instead of rounded, and the flower base doesn’t need to be flattened.