We have Programs

I wanted programs for our guests.  I wanted them to know who was who, what to expect, and more about the beautiful building they are visiting.  Besides, I wanted them to have something to keep them occupied while they waited for the ceremony to start…Perhaps it’s just me, but I’ve sat through many a graduation ceremonies with nothing to keep me company other than the program.

Our programs!

wedding program 1

Two versions, above green cover paper with ivory bond paper; below black cover with green bond paper (hard to tell it’s green in the photo).

diy wedding program 3

 

The programs are small (6″x5″), but very readable (14 point font), 9 pages long, but less than the thickness of a dime.

The inside starting with the time line for ceremony & reception:

diy booklet program wedding 1diy booklet program wedding 2

 

Some additional information (bunch of professors and trivia buffs at our wedding)–gives guests something to read if they arrive early.

diy booklet program wedding 3

 

And of course a thank you/memory page as the inside back cover:

diy booklet program wedding 4

 

 

The Layout & Assembly:

Double sided printing and binding can be a bit mind-numbing, but it really isn’t difficult.  To avoid the trial and error (and wasted paper/ink) here are steps with pictures of the layout.

In your word processing program create text boxes of equal size (mine are 6″x5″).  To bind on the left side as I did, leave  a 1″ margin on the left side for odd numbered pages and a 1″ margin on the right side for even numbered pages.  Make sure all of your text boxes are lined up the same on each page (if you uses iMac Pages, this is really easy).  You can create the first page with two text boxes, and then just duplicate that page as many times as you need–that way all the text boxes will be in perfect alignment with one another.  I strongly suggesting testing the double print on your chosen paper.  You want a heavy enough bond (paper) so the double sided printing doesn’t show through to the other side.

Your page numbering order is as shown in the photos, and then print using your double sided -capable printer (long edge binding setting). Or you can manually do this with a printer/copier by printing only the odd number program pages and then flipping the paper over to print the even sided on the other side.

I was able to fit two text boxes (program pages) per document page (as shown)

Word processing document page 1 (pages 1 & 3 of the program):

wedding program pg 1 blog

Word processing document page 2 (pages 2 & 4 of program):

wedding program pg 2 blog

Word processing document page 3 (pages 5 & 7 of programs):

wedding program pg 3 blog

Word processing document page 4 (pages 6 & 8 of programs)

wedding program pg 4 blog

Word processing page 5 (inside back cover of program–or page 9)

 

To assemble, cut all the pages to the size of the text box (if there is a line around your text box, use that as a guide).  A guillotine cutter is your friend–you can cut multiple pages at a time.

 

To create the “cover”, cut a piece of card stock 1.5″ longer than your pages and 1″ wider.  For my 6″x5″ program pages, I cut card stock strips 7.5″ across and 5.5″ high. I cut two pieces of program covers from one 12×12 piece of paper.

Fold over your cover card stock 1″ on the left side, slide in your pages (in order!)  and make sure everything looks nice. Use a binder clip to hold everything together and punch two holes through all pages and cover.

programs binding 2

progams binding 1

Optional step: insert eyelets into the holes you just punched.

Thread ribbon through the holes and tie securely.  This is your binding.

 

Done!

wedding program 2

 

I made 85 programs for approximately 120 guests, figuring some couples would only take one.

How much time did it take? Designing them took the most time.  I started them nearly a year ago, our best man changed, some the time line changed….I waited to print them for as long as I could.  I probably worked way too long on the design tweaking this and that, getting the spacing just right, etc.  But allow yourself at least 3-4  to do this and make sure you get someone else to edit them (up to the last minute, I still had “groom” spelled wrong!).

Printing & cutting takes maybe an hour–with a guillotine cutter.

Final assembly took me 2-3 hours, but I also had the extra step of eyelets, which were not really necessary.  I also seared the ends of the ribbon so they would fray, which adds time.

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Origami Pomanders

simple wedding pomanderwedding pomander1

origami pomander diy

Styrofoam balls for craft projects gives me sticker shock.  I wanted some smaller pomanders to go with my large origami topiaries I made earlier (posted here).  They will be hanging about the ceremony space and on the ends of the pews.  The best thing about this project is no styrofoam balls needed (yay!).  So the cost is the cost of paper and some ribbon.

Supplies:

Paper cut into squares (recommend 4″ or 5″ squares or the pomander will be too tiny).

Ribbon (about 2′ per pomander)

Glue gun, scissors

Maybe a stick/skewer to help thread the ribbon.

origami pomanders 1

Cost & Time:

The cost is paper.  A 12″ x 12″ sheet of scrapbook paper makes almost 2 flowers and is about $.20 each (about 7 sheets of paper per pomander). Glue sticks, the cost of your ribbon (I spent $3 for a spool which was more than enough to do eight pomanders).

Folding the flowers takes about 5 minutes each (x 12 flowers); gluing them together in the pomander takes about 10 minutes.

Steps:

1) Cut your selected paper into perfect squares and make kusudama flowers.  Each pomander requires 12 completed flowers all of the same size.  For instructions on how to make the flower, see this tutorial.

2) Cut your ribbon to length (how far you want it to hang down) –about 2 feet–and fold it in the middle.  Thread it through the center of one of your flowers (this will be your top flower in the pomander).  I had to use a skewer to help thread the ribbon through.  Knot the ribbon close to the ends and pull the loop taut so the knot sits snuggly right at the base of the flower (see the pics below).

origami pomander 2origami pomander 3origami pomander 4origami pomander 5

3) Now you will start the first row of 5 flowers.  Take a loose flower and place it snuggly against the ribboned (top) flower so that one of the petals fits between two petals of the top flower.  Make sure the base of the flowers line up with each other.  Glue in place.

origami pomander 6origami pomander 7

4) For the next flower, you will get a better fit if you match two petals of the loose flower to the two petals of the top (ribbon) flower.  A petal of the previous glued flower (step 3) will sit in-between of the loose flower (picture explains it much better!) —

origami pomander 8

Glue three more flowers working around and that completes row 1.  As you go, just make sure the base (pointy end) of the flowers all line up.  At this point you have completed half of the pomander and it will sit flat.

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5) This step is a repeat of step 3 & 4 above.  This is just row two –five more loose flowers glued to the flowers of the first row.  Again, keep the flower base lined up.

origami pomander 11origami pomander 12

6) You now have one flower left and one hole to fill.  Glue in the last flower.  Look over your pomander and glue up any loose spots.

DONE!

easy origami pomander diy

Add an extra bow around the base of ribbon if you like.  Or some pretty button/crystal centers to the flowers.

DIY Boutonnieres

Or “bouts” for the spelling challenged (like me).

I was making these Kusudama origami flowers for our cocktail/social hour decor:

origami flowers centerpiece

and my fiance thought they would make nice bouts.  Always looking to do things in advance (and save a few dollars too), I happily agreed.

Here are bouts!

diy boutonnieres

DIY paper flower boutonniere  DIY paper flower boutonniere 2 DIY paper flower boutonniere DIY paper flower boutonniere 4

I was happy with how easy they were to make.  Just a few hours for all ten, and that included making the flowers.  The cost is under a dollar for each one–if you have to purchase everything.  It is less than that if you already have a few supplies on hand.  Also, I think they look great.

Supplies: 

supplies

Floral wire: 18 gauge for the “stem” of the bout.

Jewelry wire for wiring your beads (gauge depends on the size of the hole in your beads)

Beads for the center

Leaves, or tulle, or fabric/ribbon for the backing of the bout (optional)

Plastic Straws-I recommend the shorter/smaller cocktail stirrer/straws

Floral tape (or wasabi tape) and ribbon (the ribbon is optional)

Scissors & Wire cutters

Kusudama flowers (for a how to on making these, click here).  I used 2″ squares to make mine, except for the ring bearer’s bout–I used 1.5″.

Step 1: The Center

Assuming you already have the flower made, you’ll need to string your beads for the center of your flower. I chose these glass teardrop beads and thought five of them in the center looked nice.  Cut your jewelry wire about 2-3″ long.  You’ll need one wire for each bead.

diy bout 1

Thread the wire through the bead and bend over about an inch and twist your wire tightly to hold the bead.  Do this for each bead.

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Grab all five of the wired beads and keeping them even on top, twist the wires so they are all connected together.  You’ll then want to twist in a 18 gauge floral wire. The floral wire will be your stem.  The beading wire is just not strong enough on its own.

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Step 2: Assemble the Bout

With the beaded wire and floral wire all twisted with one another, thread these through the center opening of your flower.  Cut your cocktail straw down to the desired size.  The cut straw needs to be a tad shorter than the floral wire on the flower (see picture).  The straw will serve to thicken up the stem of your bout and give the tape/ribbon something to cling to.

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Thread the wires through the straw.  You should have some floral wire sticking out of the end of the straw.  Bend it up over the straw.  This will hold everything nice and tight.

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You may want to put a touch of glue at the base of the flower where it meets the stem for added stayputtedness (not a real word).  At this point, you wrap the stem in floral tape (or whatever tape you choose), just be sure to wrap tightly around the base of the flower and get all the way to the bottom of the stem.  With floral tape, I have to do in two parts.  I use about a 5″ section to wrap just the base, and then another 5″ piece to do the rest.  If you are as bad as me with floral tape, you can wrap the whole thing in ribbon when you are done and the tape will not show.

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There are lots of things one can use as a background for their flower. I found these leaves taking up space in my craft room.  If I didn’t have them, I probably would have cut a circle of tulle, or stole a leaf from a plastic plant, or even made one out of paper.

Lay your flower and center it on your background piece.  Secure it with floral tape. Since my leaf was bigger than the base of the flower, I just pinched it in on both sides and then wrapped with tape.

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Congratulations! Your bout is done! You can add a few finishing touches if you like…

Step 3: Finishing Touches (these steps are all optional)

Since floral tape is sticky and I have cats, I finished off the stems with organza ribbon to prevent the bouts from being cat hair magnets. I just placed a dot of hot glue on the back of the bout (where the flower meets the stem) and wrapped all the way to the bottom.  A spot of hot glue on the tip of the end held the ribbon in place.

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I used a pair of small pliers to curl the stem of the bout as well.

Here they all are with cute little tags and their pins.  I love the little tiny one for the ring bearer 🙂

DIY paper flower boutonnieres

Literally Tying the Knot

Hand Fasting Cords and Ribbon

As our Save the Dates state, we will be tying the knot with a hand fasting ceremony. Making our ropes/ribbon was a fun project, easy, and inexpensive.hand fasting rope ribbonshand fasting cords ribbon

From the notions department of my favorite craft & sewing store, I selected two cords, one in green the other in ivory, and purchased 1.5 yards (if you want a traditional 3 wrap with a knot, you’ll need 3 yards).  I also bought two small tassels and hand stitched in some green crystals.  I wrapped the two cords together and taped the ends to hold them in the twisted shape.

Next was the bling.  One small silver ribbon and one in black cut about 2 feet longer than the cords. Starting about one foot in, I strung pearls on the black ribbon  at roughly every 4 inches (with knots to hold them in place) and about every 5″ I strung crystals on the silver. Both of these ribbons were then wrapped & twisted around the cords, with more tape at the end to hold them in place.

I attached the tassels on either end (more tape), and then used wired ribbon wrapped around the end to cover the tape.  It looked a little “bare” to me, so I beaded in some pearls on the end as well, stringing about 3 and then a stitch to hold them in place.

I knotted an extra black & silver ribbon onto the tail and then braided them, and then a few green, crystal, and silver beads to finish it off.  I wish my photos could capture the sparkle.

I’m sure there was an easier way, but I just made it up as I went along.

Save the Date

diy save the date

We debated on the need for these, but realized that with almost half of our guest out of state/country, it would be a good idea to send them some advance notice.  Cost is always a factor, so I borrowed the “knot tying” idea from others’ posts and looked at this video tutorial.

The cards are 4″ by 3.3″, which allowed 3 cards per sheet of 8.5×11 card stock.  I created the cards on my iMac in Pages, but have created a Word and PDF template if you wish to use the design (please note that Word changes some of the formatting/shadows on the letters, so you may need to adjust).

Card outside template:

save the date generic template outside PDF

save the date generic template outside WORD

Card inside template:

save the date generic template inside PDF

save the date generic template inside WORD

Print onto cardstock using double sided printing (or do it manually).  I used a laser printer for a sharper image. Cut out your cards (2 cuts using a paper cutter).

Before adding the string, stamp or embellish your card.  I just added a few stamps with silver ink on the front and trimmed the corners with a punch.

From the picture, you can see where to position the hole punch.  Cut the ribbon/string about 4-5″ longer than the entire length of the card.  Knot one end, thread through the  front hole, tie a loose knot (add the rings if you like inside the loose knot), thread through the back hole and knot off.  Cut off any excess.  Test it out and make adjustments. Also, if you use ribbon, lightly sear the ends with  a flame to prevent fraying.

Done.

These cards will fit easily in a 3.5 x 5 inch envelope and require typical postage.

Not So Quick DIY…

…But a great excuse to watch a lot of movies (or hockey playoffs in my case).

1000 Paper Cranes!

up close paper cranes1000 cranes

The tutorial I used is here (I needed video to figure it out).

I used the left over paper from my pyramid boxes (see below) to make 3 x 3, 2.5 x 2.5, and 2 x 2 inch squares.

diy wedding favor 11

So according to Japanese legend, I can now make my wish and have it granted by the majestic crane.

The crane motif is used in weddings because the bird mates for life,  is loyal/devoted to its partner, and shares in all responsibilities.

My wedding seems to be taking on an Eastern theme.

Quick DIY for that “Personal Touch”

Here are two very quick, very easy, and very inexpensive DIY projects for the wedding.

Send-Off Ribbon Wands:

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ribbon wands 1

 

For the ribbon wands,  buy craft sticks at least 12 inches long (e.g., round dowels).  I bought them at a craft store in packages of 20 for  $0.70 a package.  Cut ribbon in your colors so they are a few inches longer than the dowel and run the edges over a candle flame (quickly) to melt it slightly (this will keep it from fraying).  Simply  tie 2-4 ribbons near the top of the dowel.  Use a dot of hot glue to secure the ribbon to the wand.  You can add bells by threading a thinner ribbon through the bell before tying off.  I also added a small bead (hair braiding bead) over the ribbon knot for decoration only.

Cost:  Under $15 for the sticks and ribbon for 175 send off wands.

Time: If you have cats, about 6 hours to make all of them.  Without cats, about 2 hours.

BTW: Cats love the ribbon wands.  And–There is no mess to clean up at your venue.

Cocktail Stirrers for Champagne (Cocktail Hour)

DIY drink stirrersdiy cocktail stirrers duct tape

These were made simply from duct tape (yes, another use for duct tape) and plastic stirrers.  We’ll have 150-ish glasses set up on a table with champagne and pomegranate juice for guests to pick up immediately following the ceremony.  Probably raspberry and kiwi slices instead of blueberries though, but I take the picture of what I have.

Cost: $3 for a roll of duct tape, $1 for 250 plastic stirrers.  I still have lots of tape and stirrers left.

Time: An hour-ish.

Signature Cocktail Stirrers (for the reception):

So a brief explanation.  We decided to name our signature drinks after our cats.  We are NOT having a cat themed wedding, we just wanted a little personal touch.  Besides, their names are funny.  The Gatito Mojito (self explanatory), the Squeak (Vodka, orange juice, club soda, splash of sweet & sour, touch of grenadine), and the Cheechoo (non-alcoholic lime punch).

 

 

 

signature drink stirrerscocktail stirrers diy

These were even easier than the duct tape stirrers.  Just type in your sayings in a 2-colum table in your word processing program (in the first column) and your either your names, date, or in our case a wingding of a cat in the second column. The rows should be about .5 to 1 inch high, and the columns no more than 2 inches.  Print and fold.  Use double sided tape around the plastic or wood stirrer and clip the edges for the flag effect.  I made roughly 300 of these, enough to “flag” the first few drinks by our guests.  After that, I figured the novelty would wear off.

Cost: $3 for 300 plastic “deluxe” stirrers, roll of double sided tape (maybe a $1), about 8 sheets of linen paper

Time: About 1-2 hours depending on what type of paper cutter you have.

 

 

signature drink stirrers

 

The little wingdings are a good representation of our cats.  Pictured left to right: Cheechoo (dumb, simple, sweet), Gatito (prissy, elegant), Squeak (trouble-maker).

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DIY Petal Aisle Border

I saw this on Pinterest and said “Want.”

inspiration petal border photo 17a9733638

And roughly $15 and about 20 hours of labor later, I have what I want:

Photo Feb 02, 10 33 54 AM DIY whit petal wedding aisle border DIY petal runner ivory border

Supplies:

Bags and Bags of Dollar Store Petals (300 petals per bag)–I suggest starting with at least 10 bags.

Roll of masking paper for painting (like you get at a home improvement store)

Glue–I started with regular white craft glue, but quickly changed to my trusted low-temp glue gun

Scissors and tape

Dye for Petals (optional, depending on your colors)–I just tea-stained mine to make them off white/ivory

Purple Pig Rating: Easy, not messy, but has “WOW” factor . 9.5 Oinks because it is awesome.

Steps:

There are lots of tutorials for DIY petal runners.  The big difference with mine is that I didn’t use tulle for the base.  I was at the home improvement store in the paint aisle and notices a 125′ of paper masking (like craft paper) in green that was a perfect match to our wedding colors.  It was $4, so I had to buy it. Some diy brides discuss gluing petals on tulle and the glue coming through the tulle (making it hard to work with). I had no problem like that using paper.

1. To make the edges, roll out the paper and fold in half. Mine is in 12.5′ sections.

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2. Cut your design on the folded side.

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3. The curly design is a series of arcs cut and taped together.  Overlay both sides on top of each other when taping so they are match.

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4. Optional Step: Dye/stain your petals.  These white petals from the dollar store are white-out white.  I’m an ivory girl.  So I boiled a big pot of water and dumped several cups of strong tea in it and brewed up some ivory petals.  I pulled them out at various times for subtle shade differences, rinsed and put in a salad spinner (yes a salad spinner) to dry off quickly.

5. Glue on petals.  Keep gluing, get more petals, keep going.  Bored? Keep gluing.

Put just a dot of glue on each petal, and stick the glued part under the “flap” of petal next to it to hide the glue spot.  Glue in different directions, and on top of one another. But I also found it easier to glue the edges first and then work inwards.  The look you want is dropped petals.

Photo Jan 29, 9 31 57 PM

I started with regular white kraft glue, but it took too long to dry, so I switched to low temp hot glue.  You hid your glue spots by only using a tiny drop and sticking that part under the petal next to it.

This picture just has the individual sections (6 in all, two side sections at 12.5′ each, and the two curly sections) just laying butted up to each other.  I will use tape the day of to attach them on site.

DIY whit petal wedding aisle border

(please ignore the bad photo stitch for this panorama shot.  I have limits with my iPhone).